1
Information

Syllabus

Calendar

Readings

2
Textbook resources

Introduction

System Performance

Basic Economic Concepts

Public Perspective: Economic, Environmental and Social Concerns

Comparing Strategies for Improving System Performance

The Panama Canal

Equivalence of Cash Flows

Choosing a Discount Rate

Comparing Costs and Benefits

Rules of the Game: Taxes, Depreciation and Regulation

Developing a Strategy to Deal with a Problem

Public-Private Partnerships

Dealing with Risks and Uncertainties

Managing Projects and Programs

Toward More Sustainable Infrastructure

Final Thoughts

3
Lecture Notes

Introduction and motivation; Initial discussion of project

Introduction to public and private projects, evaluation methods and project evaluation checklists

Project costs and revenues; Stakeholder perspectives (public vs. private)

Time value of money; Equivalence relationships

Discount rates, minimally acceptable rate of return (MARR), rate of return on investment (IRR)

High speed rail (HSR) case

HSR Case (cont.)

Dealing with uncertainty

Project evaluation in developing countries, Case: Pure Home Water in Africa Guest lecturer: Susan Murcott

4
Assignments

1.1

Read: Moore, Malcolm, and Peter Foster.

1.2

3.1

3.2

5
Exams

Exam Info

6
Projects

Project Info

1.011 Project Evaluation (Spring 2011)

Map of existing and potential high-speed rail corridors in the United States.

Lectures 10 and 14 of this course evaluate the effectiveness of producing high speed rail corridors in the United States. (Image source: United States Federal Government.)

Instructor(s)

Prof. Joseph Sussman

Carl D. Martland

MIT Course Number

1.011

As Taught In

Spring 2011

Level

Undergraduate

Cite This Course

 

 

Course Features

Course Description

1.011 Project Evaluation covers methodologies for evaluating civil engineering projects, which typically are large-scale and long-lived and involve many economic, financial, social and environmental factors. The course places an emphasis on dealing with uncertainty. Students learn basic techniques of engineering economics, including net present value analysis, life-cycle costing, benefit-cost analysis, and other approaches to project evaluation. Examples are drawn from both contemporary and historical projects in various fields, including transportation systems, urban development, energy and environmental projects, water resource management, telecommunications systems, and other elements of the public and private projects and programs.

 

 

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